TSAA Archery News
Issue XXIV
November 15, 2002

Hi !

In this newsletter:
Medieval Archer
Runing Score
Coaching
TSAA 2003 State Championship Design Contest
State Field 2003
Tourney Calendar
TSAA Message Board

 
 
Medieval Archer
THE MEDIEVAL ARCHER
by Jim Bradbury
ISBN 0-7607-2039-8

For anyone wanting a good read on archery warfare, the Medieval Archer is the book to buy and now is a good time to buy it or for a Christmas gift. Barnes-n-Noble has it on their bargain book list at $12.98 drastically marked down from $35.00. If not on the shelf, they can order it 3-8 days.

Rick Stonebraker

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Runing Score
Running Score

By Rick Stonebraker

Running score is used in major tournaments so that competitors and spectators can see where the top archers are ranked. The only reason the running score is used in all other tournaments is for archers to get used to running score in the event they go to one of these larger tournaments. Other than that, the running score can cause an archer to make errors in their score. In the last couple of years, I have seen many archers use the running score incorrectly.

At the end of every 3 arrows or 6 arrows, the score is tallied and it is called the end score. The next end score is added to the previous end score for a running score. At a major tournament, the running score will be collected by score runners, who will give the scores to the organizers. The organizers will display the scores to see how you rank against other archers during the competition.

At the end of a distance or the end of a round, an archer should add up all the end scores instead of using the running score as the score for that distance or round. You can check it against the running score for validation but do not immediately use the running score as gospel. It is very easy to make a mistake using the running score and that mistake will carry through the rest of the tournament.

Running scores are carried over to the next distance or the next round. This is fine but at the end of the next distance/round, the scorekeeper should not subtract the previous distance/round from the running score to obtain the current distance/score. This is where errors can occur. You should add up the end scores to obtain the score for that distance/round. Place the distance/round scores in the blocks provided and then add them together and compare them with the running score. Do not lose points for yourself or your opponent by relying on an erroneous running score.

Does it matter? Yes! I was the arrow caller at an indoor state championship several years ago. During the scoring after an end, one scorer did not say the end score but only the running score and the other scorer agreed. What actually happened on that one end was one scorer added the end score wrong - he wrote a 28 when it was a 29. The other scorer also made an independent error by adding the running score incorrectly so there was a double error but both their running scores matched and the event moved on without notice. At the end of the match, I added my end scores like I mentioned above and did not catch the error. As it turned out, I did win the tournament by a single point. A week later, I looked at my scorecard and saw the end where a 28 was written instead of a 29. I should have won two points - did it matter? Yes, read on.

For example: Let's say my opponent above shot one point better then he actually did, that means we would have tied for the match, even though I actually shot one point better but it wasn't spotted at the time. He would have won the championship on the "hits-tens-nines" tiebreaker. Once I sign my scorecard, it is deemed to be accurate. So, it can happen and I am sure it has happened to others.

Scoring in General

While on the subject of running scores, scoring itself should be noted. You should be involved in the scoring of arrows in some manner. Whether it is calling the arrows, writing down the scores or looking over the shoulder of those keeping score. You are responsible for your own score whether you are writing it or not. At the end of the round, you sign the scorecard and it is your responsibility to assure that it is correct.

Typically, two people keep score and compare the end score and the running score. This is fine but in almost every instance, one person is a lot faster scoring than the other. Many times, the faster person will say the end score and running total before the other person is done and the second person will just write down what the first person says. If you notice you are faster than the other person, then get in the habit of waiting till the other person is done. Then let the other person announce what they totaled for the end score and the running score and verify it with what you have. This gives the other person a chance to actually think about what they are doing. When both parties are doing the same thing, you can be assured that the scores are probably correct. This does not mean the running scores are correct but it is close. You still need to add the end columns at the end of each distance/round and then add up these totals for your overall total.

Although I would like to see more people adding mentally, the use of calculators to add scores is perfectly acceptable and encouraged to insure an accurate score sheet. No one is going to check your work and make corrections. So, "IS THIS YOUR FINAL ANSWER?"

Tom Barker comments: "At an indoor event, I made a similar mistake. After the first end on the second day, the other scorer and I made a mistake. We carried an incorrect running total the whole second day. It was not until we checked scores that we found our mistake. For us it made no difference, but it could have. In golf if you sign an incorrect scorecard you are "Disqualified." Tom also added that the real message here was "attention to detail", a valuable life lesson. Doing sloppy paper work on the score sheet reflects poorly on you as an archer. Take the time to do it right and then you won't have to do it over or submit an incorrect score sheet. Another point Tom made was that one of the best things about archery is sportsmanship. No one wants to win by submitting an erroneously high score sheet. Furthermore, no one wants to get beat by turning in a low score sheet. Much as in golf, the scorecard is gospel and we want it to be an accurate reflection of the archer and the event. Shoot straight and write right! RWS J


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Coaching
By Rick Stonebraker

After making a few comments on SCORING and RUNNING SCORE, I remembered something else I have observed over the last couple of years and that is coaching methods. There are many top archers in this state and some very fine coaches and parents with good intentions. Some of these archers and coaches are self-appointed coaches who have never taken the Level One Basic Instructors Course and some who have taken the course obviously forgot a few very important details. Being experienced in archery is important but if you are going to coach beginners, then you really need to take a Level One course.

The course is designed to teach beginners archers, usually at a camp level. One of the fundamental principles in beginning archery is the ability to spot mistakes and to correct them as soon as possible. More importantly is to correct the mistakes with positive ideas and not negative ideas. I quote from the book: "It is seldom necessary to tell an archer what they are doing wrong but rather to show them what to do right!" This one statement is the basis of this article.

I have observed "coaches" tell their students to "STOP DROPPING YOUR ARM!" or "QUIT PEEKING!" Neither one of these statements offers any positive suggestions but rather places a negative thought into their minds. The example used in the course is: "Do not think of Pink Elephants!" No matter how much you try, that pink elephant is now in your mind. Now if I said, "Think about green elephants", the chance that pink elephants enters your mind is almost nil. Think positive, negate negative.

Back to DON'T DROP YOUR BOW ARM and QUIT PEEKING. On the first statement, you should not have to tell the student that they are dropping their bow arm. Suggest for them to keep the arm up a little longer during the shot. Hold your bow arm up while demonstrating so that they can see a solid bow arm. On the second statement, suggest to the archer to keep their head straight until the arrow hits the target. Both of these statements offer something positive and tangible. The more they see you demonstrate a solid bow arm, the more likelihood they will do what they are supposed to rather than watch you demonstrating dropping your bow arm. The more they see you demonstrate keeping your head straight until the arrow hits the target, the more likelihood they will do what they are supposed to do rather than watch you demonstrating peeking.

The above are observations I made that occur over and over. The example straight out of the Level One course uses this: POSITIVE APPROACH IN TEACHIN ARCHERY - There are two common errors novice instructors make while trying to help" 1. Only pointing out errors, telling the archer what they are doing wrong. Example: "You're gripping the bow." 2. Telling them not to do whatever they are doing wrong. Example: "Don't grip the bow."

These two statements contain no information about what the coach wants the archer to do. A correct and positive coaching statement would be, "Keep your bow hand relaxed." Athletes respect coaches who give positive instructions. Negative instructions lower athletes' self esteem and make them not want to listen.

So, no matter how good of an archer you are or how good of an arm-chair coach you think you are, find out how to handle beginning archers and take the Level One Course from a capable instructor………..and learn the basics. Starting off with the basics will offer a solid foundation to the kids that will follow them a long way in archery. Getting off to a good start is a lot better than having to make a correction later on. Good habits are easy to teach but very hard to break.


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TSAA 2003 State Championship Design Contest
Thanks to Ben Dybalas' ability to etch almost any kind of a design on a plaque, it is time to try a new idea for the upcoming year. This will be a contest for a simple design for the 2003 State Championships. I have no idea what the prize will be, maybe only to be recognized. Come up with some clever but simple ideas and all entries will be posted on the web. Let’s shoot the end of December for a deadline. As for the design, you may or may not include text as we include that on the award itself such as the event, the division and appropriate dates. For an example, this is what the current design was for the 20th anniversary state awards. Also shown is the design for the recent Aggieland invitational and an NAA event.

Rick Stonebraker

ed.note: in order to avoid sending each subscriber large photos, if you would please use this link to view the pictures of the trophies on the TSAA website.


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State Field 2003
The dates for the TSAA State Field have been set. It will be May 10-11, 2003 at the same location as last year - the Blaschke Deer Farm. More details will be forthcoming. See calendar LINK

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