WUAC 2010 - Shenzhen, China
In 2010, Shenzhen in China hosted the WUAC games as a preparation for the 2011 World Collegiate Games. This year, archery, next year about a dozen or more different sports.
So this was for the Chinese a trial for their system. security, hosting, transporting, airport processing, translation services, crowd control, dining provisions, essentially the whole nine yards.
The 12 athletes came from all over the United States - they won the right to compete in the name of the United States by their performance at the US Collegiate Championships. Essentially the 3 best archers, male and female, recurve and compound bows, represented the US. THey were:
Male:
Recurve: Jacob Wukie, Joe Fanchin, & Dakota Sinclair
Compound: Steve Gatto, Adam Gallant, and Danny Wido
Female:
Recurve: Erin Mickleberry, Sara Goshorn, Katie Jepson
Compound: Samantha Neal, Erika Anschutz, and Lindsay Jepson.
CURRENT Hometowns, in no particular order: Philadelphia, Salt Lake CIty, Boston, College Station, San Diego(OTC), Bozeman, Seattle, and even Buffalo.
Coaches were Bill Coady of Texas A&M and Benton Christiansen (father of Lindsay), Salt Lake City. Team Leaders were Megan "Megs" Bowker, of James Madison University as both archer and coach, and Ron Carmichael of Lago Vista/Austin, Texas.
In some 8 days including travel, the team shot against peers from 20 other countries. They competed, they socialized, and they learned about other cultures and attitudes. As elite athletes they will also tend to be our elites in other society endeavors, aided in part by an enhanced understanding gained by such exposures to "other cultures".
The athletes returned home with medals of gold, bronze, and silver.
I can proudly say that every archer shot his/her best - held it together- under the hardest of conditions of rain, heat, humidity, a funny language(well, foreign), VERY unusual foods, and the ultimate in transplantation for a brief time.
In short, they were ALL Americans in a strange land, who held their dignity and stood on the line of competition and did their very best in sportsmanship and competition. The United States Collegiate Archery Association was supported by a grant from the Jim Easton Foundations, which has been "growing" the sport of archery at not only the high school and intermediate school level, but also at the collegiate level.
The number of colleges returning to the ranks of competing archery has nearly doubled each year for the last three years, since Lorretta Sinclair became the director and the driving force behind the USCA, working with the Easton Foundation to insure there is a bridge for our youngest archers to KEEP THEIR SPORT GOING while they are in college, and ready then to compete for the US Archery Team and the Olympic Team, should they wish to.
Here you will find photos of both the US team as well as those they competed with and against. Some are movie clips (in which case a broad-band connection is recommended).
You may download ANY photo for your own personal use - re-post to your facebook account, use in home town newspapers (hopefully), and print some awesome posters of yourself or your son or daughter doing something excellent.
Use your mouse to click the download icon to get the large, 8 megapixel original photos, suitable for posters and prints.
NO COMMERCIAL USE IS ALLOWED WITHOUT THE PERMISSION OF THE WEBMASTER BUT NON-COMMERICIAL USE IS PERMITTED UNDER THE FAIR USE POLICY.
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THe hotel is surrounded by ponds designed to improve the picturesque nature of the area. With the typhoon blowing by, the waters were all very muddy, but still full of fish.
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He travels with a fishing rod? 'nuff said. And he took numerous small perch-like fish with a hand-tied fly in literally minutes. Before the security folks suggested he roll it up.


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When we were fortunate enough to have a police escort, our bus usually breezed through traffic to and from the stadium. Often they held the buses after loading one, till they were all full and then the caravan headed out.