TSAA JOAD FAQ:

This FAQ was created using information from some of Texas' best JOAD coaches - alphabetically, Tom Barker, Jim Krueger, and Alex & Racae Meyer.  All of their suggestions and data were merged into this html document by A.Ron Carmichael who tossed in a few comments from his experience and many mistakes he has made over the years or so of parenting and coaching an archer.  copyright TSAA, 2001-20013 - all rights reserved, however this may be reprinted and disseminated provided that  it is done "for free" and credit is given to those involved in formulating the guide. That's small enough payment when taken with the knowledge of those that are helped.   Thanks also to the late Don Branson, Jane Johnson (Past USA Archery(used to be NAA) President), and Murray Elliott (of Balbardie Archery/MURRAY's GUIDE fame) for help in reviewing the material and helping me to maintain a positive attitude. 
In archery, a positive attitude is *everything*.   Give your archer this attitude and you are half-way to success.

 

HotLInk Index:
3-spot Targets
Anchor Point
Archers Paradox
Arrow materials
Arrow Pinch
Arrow Spine
Arrow Size
Barebow
BEST
Biomechanically Efficient Shooting Technique

Bow Length
Bow Types
Button
Choosing a compound  bow
compound bow
cushion
Draw Weight
Dry Fire
Ends
GeeGaws
Fletching Vanes
Vanes
FITA Olympic Rounds (FOR)
Grouping
Handedness (Left or Right)

Indoor Outdoor Tournaments
JOAD Distances/Target Sizes
JOAD Divisions
Left Handedness
Olympian Scores
Olympic (aka recurve)
Over-bowing
Pain
Personal Best
Pins of Achievement
Plunger
Recurve(aka Olympic)
Releases
Right Handedness
Robin Hoods
Rounds Explanations
Rounds
Safety
Scoring
Spinwings compared to Feathers
Sydney Olympic Scores
Target Panic
Target Faces
Tournaments

Tournament Description
Tuning


Safety First 
The USA Archery(used to be NAA) JOAD program has a tried and proven method of teaching children, young gentlemen and ladies, the sport of archery in a way that is SAFE for all.  It is the responsibility of not just the JOAD coach, but of you, your young archer, and of every adult present at the archery range, to insure that the safety rules are followed.  Keep that in mind when you are watching your child and others shooting, and do help the JOAD coach anytime it is appropriate.  And insure that your archer understands the importance of this anytime s/he is shooting or is around someone else that is shooting.

What's a JOAD and what's a FITA?  (no, it's not a drink and a foreign sandwich)
"FITA"  is both the name (acronym/initials) of the leading organization on archery standards for the world (Federation Internationale Tir l'Arc) as well as the type of archery round shot in the USA Archery(used to be NAA) (National Archery Association) tournaments. Click on this link to go to the FITA website. PS- FITA is now called "World Archery", and the URL remains www.archery.org .   

JOAD is separate from FITA, it is a USA-only category of youth archers, the JUNIOR OLYMPIC ARCHERY DEVELOPMENT (JOAD) program.  JOAD was created and designed  by the US National Archery Association (USA Archery(used to be NAA)) to promote the development of Olympic archers.    FITA has both adult and youth divisions, while JOAD is for youth archers only.  JOAD allows archers to shoot fewer arrows per tournament at a larger target.  JOAD Instructors and Coaches must go through training and testing to be certified by the USA Archery(used to be NAA).

In order for our archers to compare and compete with other nationalities, the USA Archery(used to be NAA) adheres to the FITA standard for adult archers and has recently (2001) altered the JOAD program divisions to resemble the FITA divisions.     Youth archers are free to shoot in both FITA and JOAD tournaments.

RIGHT HAND/LEFT HAND
In the USA Archery(used to be NAA) JOAD system, the eye dominance of the archer is what decides which side of the bow the arrow should be placed on, and which hand the archer uses to draw the bowstring.

A "Right Hand" bow means that the archer DRAWS the string with the right hand (and is usually right-eye dominant).  Some archers are left handed but are right-hand archers, and vice versa.  It all depends on eye dominance.   The JOAD coach will verify eye dominance as one of the first things done with each new archer.  You can check your own eye-dominance this way:   Hold both hands out in front of you at arms' length and make a small circle with your hands, that you can see through.  Now focus on a point (say a picture on the wall, or the TV)  with this "peepsite" and keep looking at that point as you move your hands towards you.  As the hands approach your face, you will discover that the peepsite has gone to one side/eye or the other.  The eye you kept using as the hands drew near your face is your dominant eye. This technique is useful for coaches trying to assess a new archer, since the coach can see which eye the hands went to.   Another method: Instead of moving the hands towards the face, after you sight in on something through the peephole, simply close first one eye, and the open it and close the other.  The object you have sighted in on will not move when you close your dominant eye.  If the object disappears (your hands appear to jump to one side) then you have just closed your DOMINANT eye.  Try it and see! (but don't do it around your kids - they probably think you are weird enough as it is.)

The importance of eye dominance is to develop the archer's ultimate potential. An archer can shoot with using the non-dominant eye to sight in with but it may require a patch, a squinted eye, or some other trick to help aiming.  All these tricks ultimately handicap the archer from achieving the potential that would be possible if they used their dominant eye. Just as having the wrong eyeglass prescription can interfere with the best performance in school, using the weaker eye to sight with may prevent the archer from having the best success s/he is possible of attaining.

By the way, cross dominance is more prevalent in the ladies than in the men.  A Field and Stream article a few years back talked about shotgun shooting and this situation.  Also, very young archers (6-8 years) may not have settled on a dominant eye yet and may switch from week to week.

Sometime a coach may have the archer use a non-dominant eye when the parents have shelled out the money for equipment already just because they assumed that since she was right-handed that she would also shoot right-handed.   It is indeed possible for an archer who has spent months using the weak eye to SWITCH to the dominant eye/stance, but it always causes a temporary decrease in score which cause psychological problems for the youth, ranging from mild irritation to completely giving up on the sport.  Once the mind accepts the changeover, the archer will usually go on to achieve new personal bests.  It is not unusual, by the way, for the archer's score to DECREASE when a new piece of equipment is added or when a technique is radically changed. 

Also, the Koreans have decided to use the ARM dominance of the archer to determine which bow riser (left or right) to use, and the Italians are also trying it out.   Just another example that in archery there are very few total absolutes.  And there is a growing acceptance in the US, including with the author, that it is sometimes better to go with hand dominance due to the established pathways of neural mylenization already in place.

LEFT HAND RISER RIGHT HAND RISER
Pull the string with your left hand. Pull the string with your right hand

Archer's perspective

 


Archer's perspective
 
Hold the bow with your right Hold the bow with your left

PERSONAL BEST?  (Do you really have to get personal?)
Each archer progresses and improves at her or his own rate.  One of the primary goals of the JOAD coach (after safety) is to provide positive reinforcement - never negative!  On any given day an archer will shoot either better or worse than the last time - this is natural and the coach teaches that this is inevitable.  So it's more important for the archer to compete  against his or her "best" score ever shot rather than just against other archers.  This is the "personal best" (PB), and each archer keeps track of the personal best and shoots to "best" it. It has been said that the most worthy opponent is one's self and this holds true in archery as well. 

What's the difference between bows: Compound, Recurve, Olympic, Barebow (so many choices!)
The barebow is the closest to the original bow when you think of "bows and arrows".  It is archery in it's simplest form - a bow, some arrows, no sight, no pulleys, no add-on equipment aside from an arrow rest.  The appeal of barebow is that it takes a lot of effort to get reasonably good with one, yet archers can be remarkably accurate with one.  The simplicity of the bow keeps costs down as well.  

Generally, archers must invest much more time to be "good" with a barebow, the least time/effort to be "good" with a compound bow, and somewhere in the middle of those with the recurve bow.  Many times archers will start with a compound and end up shooting barebow for the "pure" nature of the barebow, and many archers will actually have two or even all three bow types just because it is fun!

A barebow consists of:

Barebow archers (and all other archers) are allowed to use:

Everything permitted or found on the barebow is also available for the Recurve/Olympic and Compound bows.

Recurve or "Olympic" bows (the names are interchangeable) start with the same shape of  bow as the barebow.  "Olympic" because this is the only style of bow allowed at the Olympics.  Barebows do not provide a level of accuracy sufficient to be competitive at the 70 meter Olympic distance. "Recurve" because the bow actually has a middle curve and then a second curve, a recurve, at the tips of the bow, are allowed to have many more enhancements to the basic barebow, such as:

Archer's Paradox?  you shoot, it goes, what's the paradox?
This term is subject to some interpretation and argument.  Essentially, when an archer uses her fingers to pull the string back, no matter how fast and cleanly she tries to release, the bowstring will always slide sideways off of the fingertips, putting sideways thrust on the tail end of the arrow.  No matter what the arrow shaft is constructed of and no matter how much spine (stiffness) the arrow has, it will bend in the middle as the back end starts to accelerate and the front of the arrow  resists the change from "at rest" to "in motion".  As a result of this bending the arrow does some uniform distorting which can be clearly seen when viewed in ultra-slow-motion video.  Check the high speed video link at the top of the photographs index page of the TSAA website.  I feel tht the "paradox" comes from the fact that the arrow is not pointed straight at the target during the aiming portion of the shot, but is actually pointing off to the side in anticipation of this distortion.  If you want to hit the target you would expect to point the arrow directly at the bullseye, and since you don't, that is a paradox.  Compound archers typically use a mechanical release,  which is a device that an archer holds in the string hand, that in turn holds the bowstring and reduces drastically or even eliminates Archer's Paradox.

PLUNGER, CUSHION, BUTTON - gee whiz! just how many terms are there to know for archery
As mentioned above the arrow is going through some distortion during release, acceleration, and flight.  Ever held a long thin stick in the middle, and "wobbled" it back and forth, so that the ends flop up and down or back and forth in unison?  The ends of the stick will continue to wobble even when you stop push-pulling on the middle.  An arrow in flight shot from a finger-release will have these same oscillations as it goes from the bow to the target.  Under the worst circumstances, that wobbling might make the tip of the arrow land well off of the bullseye.  So the cushion plunger was created to act as a bumper and tuning aid.  Essentially it is a spring-loaded plastic stick attached to the bow such that it holds the arrow at just the right angle OFF to the side of the target to allow for the archer's paradox.  It also has an adjustable spring that will push back against the arrow as the arrow starts to bend, in the first few instants of time after release.  This dampens those wobbles, those oscillations that might make the shot less accurate.

TUNING?  Is the bowstring supposed to make a particular musical note when shot?
The recurve bow is like a musical instrument - the better it is in tune, the better it will play.  Tuning is the process of adjusting the various parts - the string, limbs, rest, plunger, arrow, and archer so that they all work together in balance and harmony.  It takes a lot of experience and understanding of the mechanics of archery before one can tune a bow effectively.  The string must be the right number of strands for the weight of the bow.  The arrow must have the right SPINE for the bow weight.  The nocking point must be at the right place on the string for the diameter of the arrow.  The plunger must be set in coordination with the arrow rest, the nocking point, the spine of the arrow, and the technique of the archer's release.  Moving one component has effects on the other parts!  Tuning has many methods - check the TSAA website under Documents for several guides.  Compound bows are typically shot with a mechanical release so archer's paradox is not a factor, and no cushion plunger is needed either.  Tuning a compound bow involves more absolute measurements of string length, pulley timing, arrow rest adjustment, etc. and is generally more of a science and less of an art (the way it is with a recurve).  And no, there is no specific note that the bow should make when shot, but many archers will add or subtract twists in the bowstring (thereby making the string longer or shorter) so that the bow will "sound" better to their ear, as part of the tune process.   

Why is a stable ANCHOR POINT important?
Success in archery depends on consistency.  The archer will be taught to bring the bowstring close to the side of the jaw just before releasing the arrow.  The ANCHOR POINT is the place on the face where the stringhand comes to rest on the archers jaw.  Hopefully it will be the same place for each and every shot.  Even very small variations in the anchor point between shots can mean the difference between a 10 and a 5 (or even a miss!)  You may hear the phrase "bone on bone"  -  where the knuckle of the index finger is FIRMLY against the underside of the jawbone.

Compound bows
Compound bows are a product of modern knowledge and technology.  Their appearance readily shows that there are major design differences from the recurve bow.  One or two wheels are used to use leverage to make the bow easier to shoot than the recurve, and to make the arrow go faster.  They are typically shorter than recurves, so they are useful in hunting blinds.  They are able to shoot the arrow faster, flatter, so knowing the distance to the target becomes less crucial.  Another benefit to the arrow delivery is that it will shoot it faster so that in hunting, the game target will have less time to react to the sound of the shot and move.   With eccentrically-shaped wheels on the bow that provide "letoff" the archer doesn't have to hold as much weight while aiming to shoot the bow.  The mechanical release that compound bow rules permit reduce archer's paradox (see AP below).  Letof means that while the bow requires

The rules for compound bows permits the sight to actually have a scope (optical magnification) so the target is magnified.  The sight can also have electronics, such as lights, to illuminate the crosshairs in sunset/sunrise lowlight hunting conditions.  At longer distances, the bow must be held in a consistently vertical position for arrow accuracy.  Barebows and recurves are not allowed to have "bubble levels" which compound sights routinely employ.  All of these modern enhancements contribute to making the compound bow potentially much more accurate and easy to learn and shoot than the other two styles described above.  

Only recurve bows are allowed in the Olympics, but currently there are many tournaments for compound archers that offer sizeable money awards.  There is also a friendly (usually) rivalry between the three disciplines, but at the end of the tournament all are still friends and archers.  The typical barebow archer will haughtily observe that everyone else's bows are loaded down with junk, recurve archers will likewise point out that compound archers need training wheels, and compound archers, well, they have their disparaging remarks to make as well, but it is the humor of compatriots and is usually good natured.

What length bow should I buy?
The preferred length of a recurve or barebow partially depends upon the draw length of the archer. The following table is a good initial guide for recurve/Olympic bows but the JOAD Coach will be able to provide a more accurate suggestion to start with.

DRAW LENGTH 23-25" 25-27" 27-29" 29-31" 31" and up
BOW LENGTH

60-62"

X

       

62-64"

 

X

     

64-66"

   

X

   

66-68"

     

X

 

68-70"

       

X

Source: Archery Instruction Manual, 4th Edition, p. 39.

Why is the length of the bow important?  (one hand on the bow, one on the string, what more do I need?)
A recurve bow has a curve near the tip of the bow, both top and bottom, that is sometimes called the "deflex" or "recurve".  Without going into a physics discourse about it all, properly using this curved part of the bow is very important in making the arrow "go".   If the bow is too long, the archer will not be able to stress the recurve section during a shot and the arrows won't go as far (that's "cast").

Also, the arrows will be more difficult to choose and the bow more difficult to tune, since the arrow spine charts are based on the expectation of the archer choosing the right length bow.  If the bow is too short, the deflex will be completely stressed, but then the lower, thicker, heavier part of the limbs will also be stressed (too much), and as they are stressed the resistance of the bow climbs, resulting in "stacking" which interferes with the archer making a good shot.  Stacking is where the bow increases in draw weight as the length of the arrow/draw length increases.  As an extreme example, I have a 32inch draw length which causes a pair of limbs rated at 34 pounds to stack up to 42# at click.  So I have to draw more and more poundage as I get closer to the end of the arrow, which makes it much harder to be smooth and consistent.  Stacking also varies depending on the way the limbs are made - modern limbs have, generally, much less stacking than the older, less exotic wooden limbs. 

A last problem with having the bow length too small is that the string fingers will be "scrunched" together more because of the angle of the limbs causing the angle of the string at the arrow nock to be more acute.  This is known as arrow pinch, and makes an archer VERY inconsistent.  The fingers should NOT be touching the arrow's nock, but with a too-short bow (or one with too much poundage) this becomes hard to avoid since the sharp angle of the string literally squeezes the fingers into the arrow nock.

CHOOSING A COMPOUND BOW
Compound bows require careful measurement since they do not have the flexible range of draw that a recurve typically has.  This is best done at a good archery shop, by an experienced archer/salesperson.  This usually excludes the department store sporting goods bargain outlet.  You may find cheaper bows there, but will quickly lose the price advantage when you end up with the wrong bow.  Caveat Emptor.

An important point on the compound bow is that in most cases they are for a narrow range of draw length, so for a youngster, every 6-12 months as they grow they may need a new bow. If you are in an area with lots of youth archers there is a pretty good resale market. But many times you can be stuck with a bow that a youngster has grown out of. (You can always check the TSAA's FOR RESALE page to look for bargains in second-hand equipment)

The simple recurves that JOAD clubs typically use will work for many kids of different draw lengths and for many years.  

Is a Dry Fire as good as a dry heat? 
NEVER ever should a bow be fired without an arrow (known as dry firing) - today's bows can be damaged, limbs shattered dangerously, by pulling back and letting go of the string if an arrow is not nocked.  In addition, the nocking point may actually fly off of the string, causing injury.  And that's not cool.

Should a youth archer shoot fingers or a release with a compound bow? (well, they don't actually shoot at fingers, that's actually "shoot with a finger release or a mechanical release" but any archer would understand the question)
This is one of the most frequently asked questions for the new compound archer and one of the most difficult to answer. In the long run an archer will be more accurate and the bow more forgiving with the archer using a release aid. It is very difficult to be competitive at state and national competitions using fingers with a compound bow. 
Besides, the youngster sees Mom, Dad and all the other compound shooters using the release aid and they believe they should use one also. Having said that, it is better for a young archer to start out shooting fingers. a good analogy is when a young person begins to move from a crawl to a walk. They don’t go directly from the crawl to a sprint. It is better to learn to walk before learning to run. In archery it is better to learn the proper form and technique by shooting with the fingers before advancing to the release aid. If the toddler went directly from the crawl to the sprint they would fall many times. The "falling" in archery is called trigger punching. What happens when the inexperienced youth archer starts out with the release aid is that as soon as they acquire the target with the sight through their peep site, they will punch the trigger, which spoils the aim and the shot. 
The punched trigger and the drive by shooting leaves an arrow pattern like it was shot from a shotgun. Once punching begins, it becomes subconscious and it is very difficult to rectify. 

If it is absolutely imperative that a youngster shoots a release aid (Mom or Dad said so), then ensure that it is one especially designed for youth archers. Also, the release hand should be relaxed, the archer should pull with their back, and a large percentage of the practice is done up close to learn the proper way to activate the trigger. Shooting the release aid will ultimately help them become a more accurate archer, but they must walk before they can run. 

How much weight should the bow have?
By "weight" we mean the resistance to drawing, not the number on the bathroom scale when you put the bow on it. (Although for JOADs, lighter would be better for that kind of "weight").    The weight of the bow is rated in pounds of bowstring resistance.  It is usually measured by hooking the bowstring onto a hanging scale, and pulling down on the bow until the distance from arrow rest to string is 28 inches. (the standard distance used by bow manufacturers for this rating system).   Most JOADs will NOT be drawing their bow back 28 inches, depending on their physical size.  

Most numbers in archery bowkits are not absolutes, but rather approximations.  Your  7 year old archer may be able to press 200 pounds, in which case a larger draw weight would be in order.  A rule of thumb that Tom Barker likes to use for selecting the right draw weight TO TRY OUT for a JOAD kid is to take the age times 2, e.g. an 8 year old times 2 is 16 so a 15 lb bow is about right to start with. This works for recurves only. On older kids obviously the curve flattens out, and common sense must rule. (He would not, for example, recommend a 40 lb bow for a beginning 20 year old.) JOAD Ladies may be a little less than 2 and some JOAD Gentlemen may have a multiplier factor a little more than 2.

As for the weight of the bow itself - this is important for beginner archers as there is a wide range in the weight of the riser.  23" risers are lighter than the adult size (25"). 

OVERBOWING!   What's a good bow?  How strong should it be?
For JOAD archers, less is better.  Perhaps the single biggest mistake for a parent is in providing a bow that is too heavy for the young, growing archer.  Also known as "overbowing" , too heavy in this case means having too large of a draw weight.   In many cases it's very obvious when a youth has to wildly arch his or her back and struggle to get the bow drawn, and it is also very dangerous to other archers and bystanders if the archer cannot control the bow's direction during this struggle to draw the bow. It may not be quite as obvious in some cases - if your archer cannot draw and hold the bow for 10 to 20 seconds or so without severe trembling then the bow is likely to be too heavy.   It is important that the bow have enough weight to get the arrow to the target but any more than that is not necessarily better and in the case of growing kids with open growth plates may actually cause harm to their bones. Youth archers will typically start with 15 to 25 pounds using a recurve bow.  

It is important that the under-16 archer NOT start lifting weights in an effort to make himself stronger unless it is done under the supervision of a qualified expert  such as a sports physiotherapist.  It can cause permanent damage and stunted growth, and is not necessary.  Shooting a properly weighted bow will be great exercise in and of itself.  My own 15 y.o. daughter's got a set of biceps now that puts many of her non-archer male classmates to shame, simply due to a high number of reps with a low weight bow.

On this subject, it's important that the archer always take time to stretch and warm up and stretch again before actually starting to shoot each time.  MANY injuries are caused by inadequate preparation just before the sport.  Bungee cords, elastic bands, small weights, and various motions can prepare the muscles and body for shooting in just a few minutes and prevent long-term problems.  EVERY top archer stretches and warms up, and young archers should imitate them!  
Also, see "Pinching" for another problem associated with overbowing.

IF IT HURTS, don't do it!
There is nothing intelligent about "playing through the pain" when it comes to the sport of archery.  If injury is suspected, STOP IMMEDIATELY!  Injuries must be allowed to fully heal and the cause properly diagnosed.  The archer must be able to be completely calm and under control when releasing an arrow, and if s/he knows that it's going to cause a stab of pain to release the shot, the shot will not be good and frustration will mount.  Also, if it hurts to shoot a bow then the archer is likely doing something wrong that a coach can help correct.

Grown men will typically use a recurve bow weight of between 40 and 50 pounds, and grown women from 30 to 45 pounds.   For most of these male archers and perhaps some women, they are using a bow that is heavier than they really need.  Denise Parker, a well-known (now adult) recurve female archer, won her first national adult title using a 28 pound bow shooting  at up to 70 meters distance!  The arrows may have flown like a mortar round, but technique trumped power without a doubt.

Women, shooting less weight, are able to score as good as (yes, and better) than men, even when shooting in less than ideal conditions such as the occasional high winds seen at Sydney.    Consider this recent example, using the top ten male and female archers in the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia.   Note that women (in PINK) and Men (in BLUE) are very evenly distributed based on their actual scores but that women are the more consistent performers overall.  This makes a very good point about how much bow weight is actually needed by anyone.  It also reinforces the earlier statement about archery being a truly "equal" sport for both women and men.

In addition, as of this writing (2/2006), the world's highest score to have ever been shot in a FITA round is 1405, shot by a female Korean archer.  Yes, a woman holds the highest score record ever shot with a recurve bow: 1405 out of a possible (perfect) 1440! In fact, she, Sung-Hyun Park, has had a great year or two:

(From the FITA page:)


PARK, Sung-Hyun:
144 Arr. FITA Round  PARK, Sung-Hyun    KOR  1405 10/10/2004   Cheongju, KOR
70mPARK, Sung-Hyun  KOR 351  10/09/2004  Cheongju, KOR
50m PARK, Seong-Hyun    KOR 350  345  03/12/2003 Yecheon, KOR
70m Round (72 Arr.)PARK, Sung Hyun  KOR 682  08/12/2004  Athens, GRE   

OLYMPICS SYDNEY 2000

QUALIFICATION  ROUNDS (Pink=Women,Blue=Men)

Gendered Rank

Name

NOC

70 meter distance

Rank

Total Score

1#

KIM Soo-Nyung

KOR

337

2

671

2#

VALEEVA Natalia

ITA

337

1

667

1

JANG Yong-Ho

KOR

327

1

665

3#

KIM Nam-Soon

KOR

333

4

662

4#

YUN Mi-Jin

KOR

337

3

661

2

OH Kyo-Moon

KOR

322

4

660

5#

SADOVNYCHA Olena

UKR

331

5

658

3

KIM Chung-Tae

KOR

318

10

655

6#

KAWAUCHI Sayoko

JPN

330

6

654

4

WHITE Rodney

USA

320

7

651

7#

CHOE Ok Sil

PRK

323

11

649

5

ZABRODSKIY Stanislav

KAZ

322

5

649

8#

LIU Pi-Yu

TPE

318

21

647

6

PETERSSON Magnus

SWE

315

12

646

9#

ERICSSON Petra

SWE

322

13

646

10# SERDYUK Kateryna UKR 324 10 644

7

WUNDERLE Victor

USA

314

14

643

8

FAIRWEATHER Simon

AUS

319

8

642

9

NEEDHAM Simon

GBR

314

15

641

10

HENDRICKX Nico

BEL

324

3

640

FINAL RANKING   

Gender Rank

Name

NOC

Qual

1/32E

1/16E

1/8E

1/4F

1/2F

Final

Total

1

FAIRWEATHER Simon

AUS

642

170

161

167

113

112

113

338

2#

KIM Nam-Soon

KOR

662

167

162

165

114

114

106

334

3

VAN ALTEN Wietse

NED

638

163

160

166

106

110

114

330

4

PETERSSON Magnus

SWE

646

165

157

167

112

107

109

328

1#

YUN Mi-Jin

  KOR

661

168

162

173

110

107

107

324

2

WUNDERLE Victor

USA

643

160

152

171

108

108

106

322

3#

KIM Soo-Nyung

KOR

671

164

164

168

106

105

103

314

4#

CHOE Ok Sil

PRK

649

161

162

160

107

107

101

315

WHY  IS THAT KID'S BOW SO FANCY? 
The hardware described in the bow description above:  Front stabilizers, side stabilizers, clickers, wrist slings, finger slings, doinkers, kisser buttons, etc. are all important components that help a better archer shoot a little better once their form has developed to where they can take advantage of these tools. In the beginning, a JOAD archer needs only a bow with arrow rest, arrows, finger tab, arm guard, and perhaps a chest protector (esp. for ladies).  Adding a sight is the first logical enhancement, and many others can follow.

Another important consideration is the psychological effect of new tools. The young archer sees the other archers with a long stabilizer and THINKS it will help them shoot better. When they try one and scores improve, are they shooting better because of the new piece of equipment or is it psychological? 

This uniquely human phenomenon is called the Pygmalion Effect. It is a persistently held belief in another person (or yourself) such that the belief becomes a reality. The person believed in, being believed, becomes the person whom they are perceived to be. It's the self-fulfilling prophecy, for real.

Because the effect may be psychological, there sometimes is an advantage of not adding all the auxiliary equipment at once. Maximum benefit can be obtained from spreading these additions out over time.  Parents have been known to actually use these add-on pieces of equipment as "carrots" to lead the archer into doing chores, homework, or the like.

One important consideration is that the bow is already fairly heavy.  Adding these extra hardwares can be very counter-productive for the young archer.  It's important that once you find the good basic bow for your archer, any and all changes are made in small, minimal steps so that the archer doesn't suffer a depression of ability because of the distortion caused by excessive changes.  

What is the best material for a bow riser(handle)? 
There are currently four materials listed in order of cost that the modern bow handle is made of; wood, aluminum/magnesium, machined aluminum, and composites (carbon or ceramic). Wood is what most youth archers start with because it is the least expensive and some of the laminated wood bows will last a long time. Wood is very good choice for the beginner and allows for the development of the proper form. It is also good as an initial bow until the parent decides if the youth archer is going to stay with archery or not. But wood is usually not seen at the more competitive levels in target archery. The grip on a wood bow is substantially thicker than the other materials dues to the strength of the materials. The fragile wood does not have the strength to stand up to the rigors of the job if it were whittled down to a narrow width. Wood also changes its physical properties with temperature and humidity. 

Cast risers of aluminum/magnesium is the next step up. This adds much more strength than wood and has been well adopted into archery competition. However at higher poundages and the demands put on modern equipment of reduced weight, higher strength, etc. manufacturing flaws inherent in the casting process can lead to catastrophic failure. 

The next riser generation is machined aluminum which is made from a solid piece of aluminum. This makes the handle much stronger than the cast or wood risers and can be made much smaller in the grip area. Additional features such as adjustable limb pockets, stabilizer bushings, center shot design, dovetailed rest plates, etc. can be economically added to the handle. A recent upgrade of this design is the isogrid or "tech" seen in the Hoyt bows to take out weight and improve shootability. 

There are all carbon and ceramic risers out there but they tend to be quite expensive and have not demonstrated a competitive advantage over the machined aluminum handle. For a much more detailed view of riser material and a glimpse into the riser of the future, George Tekmitchov from Hoyt wrote an in-depth piece in the May/June 2000 "Archery Focus" magazine.

Should I use wood, aluminum or carbon arrows?
Before making an educated choice on arrow shafts, you need to know what the choices are. 

For the beginning JOAD archer, especially at scout camp or the local YMCA, wood (or even fiberglass) arrows are used because of their low cost.  Wood and fiberglass are quite sufficient for beginners and work well.  It's only after the archer has begun to group well that s/he will need "better" arrows.

Better arrows are made from aluminum or carbon/graphite, or both.  Usually archers use aluminum arrows indoors, because crosswind is not a factor and scores often are closer to perfection (making each point count more).     Outdoors, carbon arrows are smaller in diameter and therefore less affected by winds and air resistance, able to fly further.  On average carbon arrows are more expensive.  If your young archer is not sooting really well, it is hard to justify purchasing carbon arrows that are "above" the archer's ability to score good shots.

What's so good about "GROUPING"? (My kid's an individual!)
When an end of arrows is shot, they will typically make a pattern on the target.  The pattern for a beginner is naturally going to be pretty "all-over".  The "grouping" of the arrows is very low.  An expert archer will have a group of arrows that is much closer.  So there is actually two ways of judging an archer's performance - the score of the arrows shotshot, naturally, but also the tightness of the "group".  It's very desirable for an archer to be consistent - and the grouping will reflect the consistency of the archer.  A very good group of 3 arrows shot indoors at 18 meters would be for them to be within 1 or 2 inches of each other - many times they may actually be touching each other!  

Enough about grouping, back to arrow materials:

Aluminum arrows are produced using different grades of alloys that feature various degrees of strength, straightness, and, of course, cost. To the naked eye all aluminum arrows appear to be perfectly straight, so how does one know which arrow to buy? Most JOAD Clubs will have the inexpensive (but quite good) Easton Jazz or Platinum aluminum shafts.  These are fine for Recurve bows.

Higher powered Compound bows normally need to use a more durable shaft.  For compounds, the least expensive arrow shaft produced by Easton (the leading manufacturer of aluminum arrows in the world) is the Eagle Hunter. Produced from the 6061 alloy, Eagle Hunter shafts offer a strength rating of 58,000 psi and a straightness factor of +/- .010 of an inch.

The next step up the ladder, Game Getter II arrows, are made from 7075 alloy (96,000 psi) and offer a straightness factor of +/- .003 of an inch. The popular XX75 shafts are also made from 7075 alloy and are straightened to +/- .002 of an inch for even better arrow flight and improved accuracy.

The new XX78 Super Slam is Easton's strongest, lightest, and straightest aluminum hunting shaft. Made from bend-resistant 7178 alloy (100,000 psi) these shafts feature an incredible straightness factor of +/- .0015 of an inch. These arrows also feature the Super Nock and Super Uni Bushing that allow the nock to be moved, making it easy to index arrows (adjust the nocks) to any arrow rest in seconds.

Easton also makes the X7 aluminum shaft which has a 105,000 psi tensile strength and a +/- 0.0001 straightness. These shafts are extremely hard and are prone to cracking.

Still reading?  Haven't run screaming from the room?   Good.  So what does this plethora of techno-babble mumbo jumbo about alloys and straightness factors mean? The straighter an arrow is made, the more accurately it can be shot from a bow. Archers should purchase the straightest arrows they can afford.  Most archers will find the aluminum XX75 or XX78 Super Slam series arrows offer the best performance and value for the money. 

XX75 shafts retail for around $40 a dozen (plus a few bucks more for feather fletching), and the XX78 Super Slam arrows average $50-$60 per dozen. (Arrows are often sold by archery shops in the "dozen").

If you're afraid to try carbon/graphite arrows, don't be.  A lot of false information about graphite arrow durability has been circulated leaving archers confused. Graphite arrows are among the most durable shafts available, and in fact they are far more durable than comparable aluminum shafts.

Carbon graphite shafts have some specific advantages over aluminum arrows. The durability factor already outlined is an important consideration for the target archer who shoots frequently.

The smaller diameter of graphite arrows also allows them to fly somewhat faster and with a flatter trajectory than comparable aluminum shafts. At 10, 15, or 20 meters the speed and trajectory advantages of graphite arrows aren't noticeable as compared to aluminum shafts. However, at the outdoor ranges from 25 meters to 90 meters graphite shafts provide the target shooter with a pronounced flatter arrow trajectory and superior long-range accuracy.  Since the graphite arrow has less of a profile they are less influenced by crosswinds.

Top-of-the-line graphite/aluminum arrows like the Easton ACE or X10 offer a straightness factor of +/- .0002 of an inch, making them comparable in straightness to the best aluminum shafts available. They have a weight tolerance of +/- 1.5 grains.  Virtually every archer at the last olympics used X-10 arrows.  On the bottom end of carbon-type arrows there are ACC shafts.  

Graphite arrows are more expensive than aluminum. Like aluminum arrows, carbon shafts are available in various straightness factors and price ranges. Graphite arrows require special nocks, point adapters, and arrow rests.

There are two major disadvantages to the carbon shafts other than the obvious cost factor. Most pure carbon shafts are not as straight as the comparable aluminum. Also, the all carbon shaft cannot be straightened if it is damaged/bent from striking a hard object.

The combination carbon/aluminum shaft mitigates this somewhat, but at an increase cost.

Most target archers use the larger diameter aluminum shafts indoors, but go to the faster, flatter trajectory carbon arrows outdoors.

ALUMINUM

CARBON

pros/cons

pros/cons

less expensive spines vary more Higher quality (spine) More expensive
more durable cracks in shafts are not always obvious More breakable/fragile  
fatter makes bigger holes but catches more crosswind catches more crosswind (outdoors) Thinner is less influenced by crosswinds (outdoors) Makes smaller holes in target resulting in fewer line cutters
less dense   Denser flies distance better even though lighter than aluminum  
easier to find in grass (metal detectors)     can vanish/burrow into turf if target buttress is missed
uses feather fletches   uses spin wing mylar fletches  
       

SCORING by the rings
By shooting a fatter aluminum shaft indoors, the archer may make a slightly higher score.  This is because when an arrow comes to rest ON a line (breaks or cuts the line of a higher score color) of a target then the arrow is counted on the higher ring. This shot is called a "line cutter".   The score is determined where the arrow comes to rest, NOT where the hole is.  If the hole breaks the line, but the arrow shaft is actually NOT on or over the line, the lower score prevails.  Archers are limited now to arrows no wider in diameter than 9.3 mm.  On the other hand if an archer's arrow is fat then as the next arrow arrives it may be forced out to a lower score because  it glances off of the fatter arrows.   The best archers shoot smaller diameter arrows as technique will usually triumph guppies (huge arrows).

SPINE? (Is it bad when my arrows have a weak spine? are they cowards?)
Each arrow's backbone has a certain resistance to bending or flexing as it is shot.  This is determined by the thickness of the wall and the diameter of the shaft, as well as the material used in making the shaft relative to the weight of the bow (see tuning).   The more pounds of resistance in drawing the bow, the stiffer the arrow or the more spine it should have.   The arrow's behavior becomes less manageable when the spine doesn't match the bow.  There are charts provided by the manufacturer (Easton) to help the archer pick the appropriate spine/shaft to shoot.  It takes into account the variables of bow strength/weight, and arrow length (among others) to try to predict which shaft will give the most consistent and reliable performance.

Arrow Size
From the Easton Document page:
Easton uses various arrow shaft outside diameters and wall thicknesses to obtain the necessary number of shaft spines needed to shoot well from nearly all bow weight and arrow length combinations. The outside diameter is the main factor in determining shaft stiffness, AKA "SPINE". This diameter is coded in the first two digits of the shaft size number—for example, in 2312, the 23 = 23/64". This is the shaft diameter rounded to the nearest sixty-fourth of an inch. The wall thickness code is the second two digits of the shaft size number. These digits indicate the shaft wall thickness to the closest one thousandth of an inch—for example, in 2312, the 12 = 0.012". The wall thickness is the main factor in determining the shaft weight. For two shafts of the same stiffness, a larger diameter, thin-walled shaft will be much lighter than a smaller diameter, thicker walled shaft.   In USA Archery(used to be NAA) competition, the largest arrow you can legally shoot is 2317. 

Which are better, plastic vanes or feather fletching? (or why do arrows have feathers?)
Arrows often fly through the air at more than 100 miles an hour.  Aerodynamics have a lot of influence on the accuracy of a archer's shot.  If the worlds' best archer shoots a shaft with no fletchings, the score will still be very high.  Their good technique will offset the bad aerodynamics of the bare shaft.  But for the vast majority of archers, the fletchings are necessary to average out the flaws of the shot.  Fletchings cause drag, which is why they are applied to the back end of the shaft instead of the point, this keeps the front end of the arrow pointed downrange to the target during flight.   The arrow itself may have small flaws or a weak spine, or the archer may not release the shot cleanly, and the arrow would therefore tend to curve or veer off.  So the fletchings are aligned to make the shaft ROTATE as it flies through the air.   Any flaw on the shaft will therefore, due to rotation,  spread it's bad influence evenly over the 360 degrees of rotation, so that the AVERAGE effect of the flaw is still to the center of the flight.  

SO WHICH ARROW IS BETTER?  
The answer to that question depends largely on shooting style. There are no wrong choices, only personal preferences. Archers who shoot aluminum arrows using finger tabs or gloves are usually best serviced with feather fletchings. The natural texture and softness of feathers allows them to grab the air and quickly stabilize an arrow as it speeds towards it target. Feather fletching compensates for minor flaws in the arrow release, allowing for consistent shooting accuracy despite human error.

Feather fletching is sold in left- or right-wing (or left-hand/right-hand) versions. A subtle right- or left-hand twist is used when gluing turkey feather fletching onto the arrow shaft. This slight twist in the feathers helps stabilize the arrow during flight (causes rotation)  and gives better accuracy.  The feathers that are derived from turkeys (the vast majority of feather fletchings come from turkeys) are segregated by whether they are from the left or right wing of the turkey, as this determines whether the fletchings are right-hand or left-hand in nature.

Natural feather fletching isn't without its problems. A lack of durability is a common complaint of some archers. Feather fletching is easily matted (making them ineffectual)  in wet weather and can be quickly damaged if the feathers come in contact with the target or other arrows while practicing.

Plastic vanes are more durable that feather fletching and they provide excellent arrow flight when used properly. Those archers who use compound bows and mechanical release aids will find plastic vanes deliver consistent accuracy in all conditions.

Plastic vanes may be attached to the arrow shaft in a straight, left-wing, or right-wing pattern. The most common configuration is a slight right-wing twist. A slight twist in the vane helps the arrow stabilize arrows quickly resulting in better accuracy.

Plastic vanes are also available in different styles and sizes. Style normally relates to the vane height and size to overall length.

Three fletch (two hen feathers and one cock feather) arrows are the most common with target archery buffs.

A special kind of plastic fletching is the mylar spin wing. This is used on the smaller-diameter carbon aluminum arrows and provides a lower profile, less drag and thus better long range accuracy.  It is attached in straight-line alignment to the shaft. 

Plastic/Mylar VANES

FEATHERS

+ Durable

- Require special storage

+ Quiet

- Noisier

+ Waterproof

- Not functional when wet

+ Less expensive

- more expensive

- Heavier than feathers

+ Lighter than vanes

+ Readily available

- Less available

- Good clearance a factor

+ More forgiving

A special jig not necessary for mounting

+ Maximum stabilization

double-stick tape tape or glue

 

TARGET PANIC: (The targets do not shoot back; what is the deal?)
This is something I would rather not be able to write about from first-hand knowledge.  Target Panic afflicts most good archers at some point in their career.  It will help you to understand it BEFORE it happens to your archer, so that IF and WHEN you might see it in an archer you know or coach, you will understand just a *little* bit better.

Target Panic has a number of names, and it afflicts athletes in a number of sports.  Any sport where the athlete has at least a moment to THINK about an action is a candidate sport for the equivalent of Target Panic.   Essentially, the conscious mind steps in and interferes with what should be an almost-unconscious action of the body.  A baseball catcher stands to return the ball to the pitcher, and it sails into the infield over the pitcher's head.  A golfer tries to address the ball for a simple putt, or a drive, and completely flubs the shot.  An NBA star goes to make a free-throw shot, something he does thouands of times in practice, and it's a brick that thds on the rim before falling out of the hoop.

In golf it is called the yips.  In archery, target panic.   It only affects *good* archers.  New, basic, naive archers shoot without consciousness naturally but in the normal progression of excellence an athlete inevitably begins to ask "why" and "how", and their mind gets in the way of a perfectly simple process.  You cannot predict when nor why.  The archer may be asked to adopt a slight legitimate change in form by a completely legitimate and expert coach, only to affect the archer in a completely unexpected way.  Once it starts, it may cause only a mild perturbrance in the archer's path, or it may destroy an entire career, driving the athlete from the sport. 

Many "coaches" will make their entire career an effort to teach others how to NOT experience TP.  The problem as I see it is that every person finds their own particular way to establish panic in their mind about making a simple mechanical process with the upper body.  The disconnect has profound effects you will not even begin to appreciate until YOUR archer goes into that dark room.  First, accept that you may not be able to help your archer find a way out of that room.  That space.  That dark forboding hell.  Melodramatic?  no.  If you can put yourself into a space where you want to simply touch your nose with your eyes closed and cannot, then you may begin to understand how the simple art of shooting a bow is so difficult for someone with TP.  In one case, the archer has superb form during practice.  But when the tournament starts the archer performs 99.5% of an entire shot cycle but fail with the last 0.1mm of draw - the part that takes the tip of the arrow past click. Something in the archer's conscious mind simply intereferes with that unconscious process that the superb archer relies on.  Aiming is after all, best performed with total innocence and unconsciousness.  Once an archer starts down the road of "thinking" about how the shot is accomplished, many will be unable to continue improving.

When the archer has TP, he or she will become terribly frustrated.  A coach must be completely, completely non-judgmental about this.  You, the parent or the coach, cannot FORCE the archer to NOT HAVE TP.  It is just not that simple.  If it happens to your archer you need to be supportive, open to explanation, completely interested in *any* revealing emotions and thoughts the archer is willing to share with you. You can make suggestions, you can take "an attitude", but in 99+ % of the cases you will simplly help to destroy the athlete;'s future as an archer.

If you can regress the archer to before the point of the infection (and this is a viral infection of the mental sort) and help him or her to understand what is going on, the archer MAY be able to grow out of the hole.  You can HELP the archer, but you cannot FORCE the archer.  As much as you might wish to just MAKE the archer shoot as he or she did before, it likely will not happen.  You CAN MAKE IT WORSE if you are not careful.   My advice is to find a new coach, an HPP coach, that can introduce huge evolutionary changes in the archer's form that MAY help to actually distract the archer to the point of laying down a new mental track for shooting.

It can be a real bear.  I am sorry there is no one sure cure.  Do not believe anyone who says there is, he is only selling a snake-oil product that has little chance of success. (but not a 100% useless chance).

TARGET FACE DIFFERENCES: (The lore of the rings)

    JOAD - a US phenomena not used in other parts of the world - JOAD is a US style of youth archery that follows SOME of the "FITA" rules but not all.

    FITA - the target is the same but is usually smaller than the JOAD uses

from the FITA Rule Book

ROUNDS DIFFERENCES:

  JOAD

 FITA

3 spots? (Is anyone going to spot me?)


When an archer gets to a high level of accuracy, a problem arises in that they will tend to hit their own arrows.  "Robin Hoods" are very rare due to modern materials and designs.  But a glancing shot will usually result in a loss of points - when the arrow is headed to the X ring, hits an arrow already there and ends up in the 7 ring, the archer will benefit in switching from a traditional target to a "3-spot".  A three spot takes up about the same amount of space as a tradition target face described above.  Instead of rings x/10 through 1, it has THREE x's through 6, spaced either in a straight line or else a pyramid.  When the 3 spot is used, the archer puts one arrow into each of the spots.  Despite the optical illusion, the rings are (really) the same size as the single 40cm spot but if the archer is inaccurate beyond a 6 ring then s/he will end up with a MISS instead of a 5,4,3,2, or 1 .  If the archer never shoots less than a 6 then since only one arrow is put into each spot, there is no chance of lost points due to a glancing shot.  It is no small thing to switch from a single target to the three spot - it usually takes an archer some effort to mentally switch, and even a single miss can put the archer at a deficit.

ROBIN HOOD?  (Finally a term I know.  Or do I?)
a Robin Hood is the name given to (you guessed it) an arrow burrowing into or splitting an arrow already in the target.  Traditionally it is reserved for only when you hit those arrows which were in the bullseye (10 or x ring).  The nocks used today are designed to prevent this from happening since when it happens you are going to lose the use of at least ONE expensive arrow.  Many times the archer that shot the arrow executing the shot that robin hoods will buy the arrow from the splitee in order to keep the pair together as a memento.  You do NOT automatically "own" the arrow you just ruined.

What is an "Olympian" score? (DOES my archer have to go to the Olympics to get one?)
The USA Archery(used to be NAA) has created a series of levels of proficiency for archers to use to provide milestones, or progress indicators, as they get older, gain experience, and generally get better in archery.  Just like scouting provides ranks of achievement, JOAD provides ranks.  Each archer will advance at his or her own rate, and the JOAD coordinator will assign the award once the archer shoots the score necessary for the rank.  It must be shot in a "tournament-like" condition with at least 3 JOAD archers shooting and an adult supervisor/sponsor present.   The best possible score is 30 arrows times TEN, which is 300.  Therefore an archer must shoot a perfect round of 30 arrows to achieve the GOLD OLYMPIAN level.  Very few archers will ever in their lifetime score a perfect set of thirty TENS in a row, but it always a possibility on a "good" day.  There is also the Silver Olympian and the Olympian ranks, for shooting slightly less than PERFECT rounds.

Each Olympian will receive a JOAD recognition award from the USA Archery(used to be NAA) office. In addition, first-time Gold Olympians receive a watch, first-time Silver Olympians receive a sport bag (one time only for both). Archers earning Olympian status receive a one-year free USA Archery(used to be NAA) membership (once for Indoor Olympian and once for Outdoor Olympian).

The following is required to be sent to the USA Archery(used to be NAA) with the request for recognition:

National Archery Association
JOAD Indoor Qualifying Rounds As of January 1, 2002
Score to shoot in a 30-arrow round to qualify
Distance and Face Qualified Archer Yeoman Junior Bowman Bowman Junior Archer Archer Master Archer Expert Archer Olympian Silver Olympian Gold Olympian
9 Meters Olympic - 60cm
Compound - 40cm
50 100 150 200              
18 Meters Olympic - 60cm
Compound - 40cm
  30 50 100 150 200 250 270 290 295 300
18 Meters - 40cm Face
Olympic - Outer 10
Compound - Inner 10
  30 50 95 145 190 240 260 280 285 290

 

National Archery Association
JOAD Outdoor Qualifying Rounds as of January 1, 2000
Score to shoot in a 30-arrow round to qualify
122 cm Face Qualified Archer Yeoman Junior Bowman Bowman Junior Archer Archer Master Archer Expert Archer Olympian Silver Olympian Gold Olympian
Distance 15m 20m 25m 30m 40m 50m 50m 60m 70m 60m 70m 60m 70m 60m 70m
Olympic
Outer 10 Ring
130 150 170 190 200 200 230 240 225 260 245 270 255 280 265
Compound
Outer 10 Ring
150 170 190 210 220 220 250 260 250 280 270 290 280 295 285

Olympian Considerations (Could it be there is a "bad" time to shoot an Olympian score?)
One benefit of shooting an Olympian score, if done at the right time of the year, can result in the USA Archery(used to be NAA) offering a trip to the Chula Vista ARCO Training Center in Chula Visa, California.   Only the top ranked archers will make the trip, 1 of each gender and each bowtype from each region of the U.S.  Selection is based on FOUR Tournaments shot in the previous year with a minimum of THREE to qualify.

Olympian Award Trip Scoring System
Tournaments 1st place 2nd place 3rd place 4th place 5th place 6th place
JOAD National Outdoor 11 9 7 5 3 1
Regional JOAD Indoor 10 8 6 4 2 0
Regional JOAD Outdoor 11 9 7 5 3 1
Regional USA Archery(used to be NAA) Indoor 8 6 4 2 0 0
State JOAD Outdoor 11 9 7 5 3 1
State JOAD Indoor 10 8 6 4 2 0
Regional/State Outdoor 9 7 5 3 1 0

For each tournament listed above the archer must add up the points for the place the archer won.  The highest scoring archers are chosen provided that the archer has NOT been selected to the Junior US Archery Team (Jr. USAT). 

The situation is this; a youngster can shoot their olympian AFTER all the tournaments that are used to determine the points for the free trip have occurred. This in fact has happened in 2000-2001 to three very good Texas archers.  They each shot their olympians in the period of August 2000 to February 2001. The tournaments used for the points to determine the ranking on who gets to go were shot in Feb. 2000 to July 2000, all before they shot their olympians, and they did not shoot all of the desired tournaments. The result is that unless the archer shot at least three and preferably four of the eligible tournaments (for example: TSAA state indoor JOAD, Indoor Nationals [FITA and JOAD], Regional JOAD outdoor, State JOAD outdoor, State outdoor FITA and JOAD Nationals), the youngster will not qualify for the trip.

The result is that for the up and coming youngsters you really have to "bet on the come". If you want your archer to be eligible for the trip and the prestige you need to make sure they are entered in the eligible tournaments, IN CASE they shoot their olympian sometime later. 

Regardless, SAVE all scorecards and result sheets for the all tournaments. If it was a bad weekend, use it later to show the progress the archer makes when s/he turns in a good performance- always positive, rather than negative, feedback.

PINS:
For each benchmark score, the archer can buy a pin to wear on his/her quiver to document her ability.  These are FITA pins, and are internationally recognized as an indicator of quality.  For more information on this, use this link.

What is an end? (Does everyone go home?)
An "END" is the arrows shot during one shooting turn.  Ends are usually 3 arrows or 6 arrows by each archer in a given amount of town, then they are scored and pulled from the target.  Generally, only the ends for the longer distances outdoors are  6 arrows.  The name arose from early archery - in England the King required all men to shoot each week, and each town and village had a green area at the center of the town devoted to the purpose.  There were two berms of dirt with targets at each END of the green, and once all arrows were shot at one END, the archers carried their bows down to get their arrows, and then shot back in the other direction.  Hence a ROUND was originally two ENDS.  Oh yes, and you only get to go home at the END of the tournament. 

ROUND?  (Who buys the round?)

A "ROUND" is today a set number of ends, such as 10 ends per round.   At club shoots, there are sometimes rounds afterwards (in the pub), purchased by the losing archer(s), especially in England where clubs have been in existence for literally hundreds of years in villages, towns, and even at the royal palace. 

What is the difference between Indoor and Outdoor tournaments?
It's a function of space availability.  It's hard to find 90 meters indoors in which to shoot arrows.  Generally, indoor FITA tournaments are held in the winter months, Outdoor tournaments during the spring and summer.  Indoor distance for USA Archery(used to be NAA) tournaments is 18 meters.  JOADs shoot two rounds of 30 arrows at 60cm targets for the indoor tourneys, at 18 meters. 

Outdoor tournaments usually consist of rounds of 36 arrows per distance, shot either in ends of 3 arrows each at the two closer distances, or 6 arrows at the two longer distances.  Outdoor FITA/JOAD tourneys are usually composed of four distances for all but the Yeoman archers (two distances).  Generally the longest distance is shot first and then each subsequent round moves to the next closer distance.  See the combined table further below for both divisions, ages, distances.  It is legal to shoot the SHORTER distance first, and then work to longer distances.

OUTDOOR TOURNAMENT DISTANCES for adults
  Division Distances Target Size
FITA  Men 90-70-50-30 meters 122 cm (two longest)
80 cm (two shortest)
  Women 70-60-50-30 meters

The above target distances are the same for recurve and compound archers, but all compound archers will score on the inner 10 ring. 

What determines whether my child is a Junior or a Yeoman!   ? (I'm so CONFUSED - is that why little Johnny keeps saying,  YO! Man! and aren't they all archers??)
JOAD divisions are based on the age of an archer and his/her date of birth. Archers shoot in each division is through the end of the calendar year of the birthday that makes the limit.  Archers can shoot in HIGHER divisions than their age group if they want/need the challenge found in competing with older archers.  Once an archer's 18th year has passed and they turn 19 they are no longer eligible to compete as JOADs and are classified as "seniors" (adults).  By the way, "Masters" is the designation for those archers 50 years of age and up.

In 2001 the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Board of Governors (BOG)  made changes in the rules to bring the US JOAD divisions into line with the more recently adopted divisions of the world-wide archery organization (FITA).  As one of the primary goals of the USA Archery(used to be NAA) is to produce Olympian archers, this enables US youth archers to more easily compare their performance with archers of other nationalities.   The BOG also chose to create noncompetitive divisions to avoid forcing archers into competitive situations they might not like.   The names used for the newly adopted competitive divisions are (FITA) Junior, Cadet, Cub, and Bowman.   The two noncompetitive divisions are  USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer and USA Archery(used to be NAA) Yeoman.  I suggest always including the "USA Archery(used to be NAA)" and capitalizing the "A" in Archer division to differentiate it from the generic term "archer". 

For an example of what division your child belongs to, click on this link (http://texasarchery.org/JOAD/age.htm ) to go to a division calculator.  If doing this during 2001, follow the instructions there to project a year in the future.

2002 JOAD Age Classifications and Rounds and Distances

For Recurve Archers

Name

Thru the year archer turns:*

Indoor JOAD

Indoor USA Archery(used to be NAA)

Outdoor JOAD/USA Archery(used to be NAA) – Gentlemen **

Outdoor JOAD/USA Archery(used to be NAA) – Ladies **

Junior – (Jr. USAT#)

18

60 @ 40cm

60 @ 40cm outer 10

90, 70, 50, 30 meters

70, 60, 50, 30 meters

USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer – (recreational class)

18

60 @ 40cm

60 @ 40cm outer 10

60, 50, 40, 30 meters

60, 50, 40, 30 meters

Cadet – (Jr. USAT#)

16

60 @ 40cm

60 @ 40cm outer 10

70, 60, 50, 30 meters

60,50,40,30 meters

Cub

14

60@ 60 cm outer 10 ring

60 @ 40cm outer 10

50, 40, 30, 20 meters

50, 40, 30, 20 meters

Bowman

12

60@ 60 cm outer 10 ring

60 @ 40cm outer 10

30, 25, 25, 20 meters

30, 25, 25, 20 meters

USA Archery(used to be NAA) Yeoman – (NO National Competition)

8

30 arrows at appropriate target, tournament directors discretion

60 @ 40cm outer 10

Tournament Directors discretion

Tournament Directors discretion

COMPOUND ARCHERS

Name

Thru the year archer turns: *

Indoor JOAD

Indoor USA Archery(used to be NAA)

Outdoor JOAD/USA Archery(used to be NAA) – Gentlemen **

Outdoor JOAD/USA Archery(used to be NAA) – Ladies **

Junior –(Jr. USAT#)

18

60 @ 40cm inner 10

60 @ 40cm inner 10

90, 70, 50, 30 meters

70,60,50,30 meters

USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer – (recreational class)

18

60 @ 40cm inner 10

60 @ 40cm inner 10

60, 50, 40, 30 meters

60,50,40,30 meters

Cadet – (Jr. USAT#)

16

60 @ 40cm inner 10

60 @ 40cm inner 10

70, 60, 50, 30 meters

60, 50, 40, 30 meters

Cub -

14

60 @ 40cm outer 10

60 @ 40cm inner 10

50, 40, 30, 20 meters

50, 40, 30, 20 meters

Bowman

12

60 @ 40cm outer 10

60 @ 40cm inner 10

30, 25, 25, 20 meters

30, 25, 25, 20 meters

USA Archery(used to be NAA) Yeoman – (NO National Competition)

8

30 arrows at appropriate target, tournament directors discretion

60 @ 40cm inner 10

Tournament Directors discretion

Tournament Directors discretion

           

*Archers may choose to compete in an older division.  The USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer and USA Archery(used to be NAA) Yeoman classes are for the recreational archer and for those who are unable to reach the adult distances. 
#
Scores shot by a JOAD archer while shooting in the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer/Yeoman divisions cannot be used to determine eligibility for the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Junior USAT (US Archery Team).

**All outdoor classes shoot the first two distances (starting with the longest distance) at the 122cm target face (outer 10 ring), and the last two distances at the 80cm target (outer 10 ring). Please note that the Bowmen shoot 25 meters twice (once at each size target). All archers shoot 36 arrows at each distance.

This was provided by Ann Bakken - please let her know if you find it useful.

When to move up? ( Like, do we have a choice? )
Young archers generally will stay in their age classification until they are forced up by the rules.  In some cases they will exhibit a level of accomplishment beyond their years and peers.  In such cases they will actually benefit from moving to an older/higher class division in order to provide them with continued impetus, competition, and motivation to excel.  One JOAD coach with a lot of experience in this area, Jim Krueger, recommends that once an archer has shot an Olympian (see above) that archer should probably move into the Junior classification.  

WHAT, "FOR"?(or in Texan, "WHUT, FER?)
WHAT is a FOR?   FOR is short for "FITA OLYMPIC ROUND".  The FITA Olympic Round came about as an attempt to make the archery competition more exciting and decisive (exciting for the spectators, decisive for the archers).   In essence two archers stand face to face and alternate shots - in just a few shots  (12 or 18 arrows) one archer will win and the other, well, loses.  Many outdoor FITA tournaments now have two components - the FITA rounds, treated as a "qualification" or preliminary round, where an archer shoots 144 arrows (4 rounds of 36 arrows) and then shoots a FOR on the last day.   The FITA portion acts like a "ranking" tool for the FOR, where archer #1  from the FITA shoots against archer #64, and so on according to a stated formula in the FITA rulebook.  

Generally JOADs do not have FORs except at the yearly Outdoor National JOAD Tournament, but other adult tournaments throughout the year will provide opportunity for this experience.  The AVERAGE of the FITA and FOR components together can determine the final outcome of the tournament.

The ends consist of 6 arrows shot in no more than 4 minutes/end at 122cm targets 70 meters distance, a total of 3 ends (18 arrows= possible 180 points).  The winner advances, the loser sits down. When there are only 8 gentlemen and 8 ladies in each division left, the format changes to the "Finals Round", with  ends of 3 arrows, same distance and target face, for a total of of 4 ends (12 arrows= possible 120 points ).  Shooting alternates, one arrow/archer at a time, each archer has 40 seconds to loose the arrow.  This culminates in the Gold Medal Match.  

You should try to have your archer participate in some practice FORs prior to the JOAD Nationals, as the format is very different and takes some getting use to.  It's very difference can "throw" the unprepared archer who might otherwise be shooting the FITA portion well.

Why should I encourage my JOAD archer to compete in tournaments? (Who, me, a pushy parent?)
The USA Archery(used to be NAA)'s JOAD program is designed specifically to provide a great degree of positive reinforcement to youth in a safe manner.  A goal of the JOAD coach is to get every kid shooting (safely) within only a few minutes of first picking up a bow, and to provide constant POSITIVE  encouragement as the archer progresses through the achievement levels.  JOAD coaches are taught to never (or rarely) use negative terminology when helping the archer.  For example, Instead of saying "You made a bad shot.  So don't drop your arm!" a JOAD coach will encourage improvement by saying "That was really close! The arrow will go low if you let your arm down early, so stand up tall, and keep pointing your arm to the target until the arrow hits it!"

As for tournaments, it is only natural that parents want their child to excel AND have fun, and competing in JOAD tournaments will almost always provide further positive reinforcement as virtually every archer will receive formal recognition by the group, especially in the local and regional events.  It is remarkable how positive the tournament can be for an archer - there is usually anticipatory stress, but almost always the archer will be having a good time, by the time the first arrows fly!

A unique thing about archery competition that sets it apart from other sporting competitions is that while there is a degree of "do better than the other guy" element, there is much more emphasis placed on "try to shoot your personal best" along with a social promotion between the archers.   During a FITA round the archer does not often see directly the performance of other archers in the same division so they cannot compare their own performance until the round is finished.  There is not the usual "I'm being beaten" stress and loss of self-esteem!  JOAD archers gain great self-esteem by virtue of competing against themselves and improving on their personal best scores.    It is important that parents not place too much pressure on "winning" as opposed to encouragement towards a "personal best" and "a good time".  By the way, there is no yelling at the referees at an archery tournament!  

Webmaster's note: The archers I witnessed at the three JOAD national outdoor tournaments I have been to almost seem to view the shooting as getting in the way of their socializing and friend-making (but not quite).  JOAD (and archery in general) is a non-contact sport that promotes manners and sportsmanship, as well as mental strength and physical stamina.  About the only folks I have seen that truly were not having fun at tournaments involved their parents having a go at each other while the kids were left looking on, embarrassed by the immaturity of their parents, or else were in reaction to inordinate and unreasonable pressures created by, you guessed it, the parents.

OF SPECIAL NOTE: Archery is one of the few sports in which kids with physical disabilities may compete head-to-head with "regular" kids.   For example, archers in their 60s and 70s, and even in wheelchairs, have competed and fared well in the regular olympics in recent years, making archery a truly unique sport for an entire lifetime.  This provides the able bodied youth with valuable experience in associating with "disabled" people (archers) who may very shoot their pants off, and vice-versa of course.  FITA specifically mentions archers with disabilities and provides for them to participate in all archery events that they might wish to, provided the tourney director is notified ahead of time so that any facilitative measures can be taken that might be appropriate.  How many Olympic sports can say that?  Archers in wheelchairs have represented their countries at the "able-bodied" Olympics as well as of course, the Paralympic Games.

In addition, archery is surprisingly one sport where many ladies will shoot better than many men, on the same target and at the same distances.  Statistics on the FITA page from the 2000 Sydney Olympics show that many women scored better than many of the men!(see above)   Archery sends a great message to our young women AND our young men about equality of the sexes and the disabled, as well as sportsmanship.  See OVERBOW! below for further information along these lines.

Many tournaments are both an adult (FITA) and JOAD tournament together.  JOAD archers are allowed to shoot in both categories and often do.  It amounts to a lot of arrows, but it is good fun.  Or rather, it CAN be good fun, or it can leave the young archer with a very bad feeling about archery!

Parents of those youngsters planning on shooting BOTH the JOAD round and a standard FITA round in one tournament should make every attempt to spread the rounds over three days.  It is common for even very GOOD youth archers to struggle on their last round, even with the shooting spread out over three days. You must decide if it is really worth shooting all three rounds based on the drop in performance that so frequently occurs on the last round.  It is tacitly unfair for you to have your archer shoot a weekly average of say, 60 arrows during practice and then expect that s/he will suddenly be up to the physical demands of shooting 200+ arrows on a single weekend.   We see kids going home very frustrated by the "recency" effect: they can only think about the last exhausting round and what might have been, rather than the really good arrows (and the fun) they shot on the first or second rounds.  Think about this: If your archer uses a bow with a 25 pound draw weight, and shoots 120 arrows, it is the equivalent of pulling 3,000 pounds!   

WHY are all the archers so well behaved?  (Is it because they are always called Gentlemen and Ladies?)
One of the keys to safety is an absence of misbehavior such as rowdiness, running, fighting, etc. on the archery range - behavior totally unassociated with both young kids today.  Yet it will be obvious at any JOAD session that something different is afoot.  Archers in general display a certain maturity beyond their years.   The USA Archery(used to be NAA) has very specific rules about behavior during tournaments, both JOAD as well as adult, and the rules apply to the parents as well as the competitors:

SPORTSMANSHIP AND CONDUCT (from the USA Archery(used to be NAA))
In the JOAD programs young women and men are referred to as ladies and gentlemen.  All lady and gentlemen members of a JOAD club have the responsibility to show good sportsmanship and proper conduct at all times.  This conduct should extend to time on and off the competition field.

The rules of proper conduct are those defined in the Official FITA rulebook and those adopted by the USA Archery(used to be NAA) and JOAD programs.  If an archer displays conduct at a tournament which is viewed to be unsportsmanlike, he or she will be warned by a Judge and/or by a JOAD Committee member, if present.  A report in writing will be forwarded to the JOAD Committee, Officials and Rules Committee and the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Board of Governors.

DRESS CODE:
USA Archery(used to be NAA) Tournament Dress Code (as of January 1, 2000)

Target and Field Archery
a. During competitions competitors shall wear appropriate, professional and coordinated attire.
b. Skirts, skirts, shorts or trousers shall be constructed of any suitable navy blue, Khaki, or white material other than blue denim. Blue denim is acceptable ONLY for field archery. Shorts must have a minimum inseam of 5 inches.
c. Blouses, collared shirts and tee shirts may be composed of any color or combination of colors. For women, upper garments incorporating shoulder straps shall conform to a 3-inch or larger strap. Men are required to wear long or short sleeved shirts.
d. At no time may camouflage clothing be worn as an upper or lower body garment.
e. Footwear must be worn by all competitors at all times during the tournament.


Advertising and Trademark Restrictions
a. Advertising and trademarks on clothing must adhere to the standards established in the FITA Constitution and Rules as set forth in articles 2.2.5, 2.2.6, 2.2.7 and 2.2.8.  FITA Rule books may be downloaded from the TSAA website on from the documents page, and from the FITA website.  Rule book TWO contains the articles cited, in chapter two.

Also from the USA Archery(used to be NAA) - If your archer gets good enough:


{Webmaster: NOTE that the phrase "JUNIOR USAT" means "NOT THE SENIOR US ARCHERY TEAM" while "Junior division" applies to the JOAD division called Junior and not all junior-aged archers.   Those archers which compete in the division above cadet  called the "USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer" Division are NOT considered with regard the Junior USAT, so if your archer is too old for the JOAD "Cadet" classification then s/he must shoot in the "junior" division in order to be eligible for the Jr. USAT team.} 
Shooting in a tournament in the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Archer division does not disqualify an archer from consideration for the Jr. USAT (team), however the score obtained in that division will not count towards the Jr.USAT. 

Junior US Archery Team (aka  Jr.USAT)  pronounced YewSat)   (sat?   where did I sit?)

The team is made up of the top five Junior shooters and the top Cadet in each division. The JOAD Committee, along with the Athlete Training Committee, announced the Junior USAT team selection Process which was approved by the Board of Governors:

Junior USAT Team Composition

The US Junior USAT team will be made up of the top five Junior shooters and the top Cadet boy and girl shooters in both the Recurve Division and the Compound Division.
The Athlete Training Committee determined the method of ranking and the necessary tournaments for ranking. They are:
Placement at the JOAD Outdoor National Championships - Cincinnati, Ohio July 12-14, 2002 (used as final tie breaker)

PLUS
Placements at two of the following ranking tournaments:
USA Archery(used to be NAA) National Indoor Championships, regional sites March 1-10, 2002 (Final Ranking)
National Target Championships Canton, Michigan July 29 - Aug.2, 2002 (Final Ranking)
Junior World Trials Chula Vista, California June 7 - 9, 2002 (Final Ranking)

PLUS
Posting at least one minimum qualifying FITA Round score at an USA Archery(used to be NAA) -Sanctioned Star FITA event or USA Archery(used to be NAA) - Sanctioned Qualifier.
(Junior Division only)

 

  Olympic Recurve Compound
JOAD Gentlemen 1230 1300
JOAD Ladies 1210 1280

PLUS
Successfully completing the 12-minute Fitness Test with rating of "FAIR" or better.  See the Link to the Fitness Test on the JOAD Info page of the TSAA (http://texasarchery.org/JOADs&Clubs/FitnessTestJrUSAT.htm)


Those born in or after 1985 are eligible for Junior USAT for the year 2003.
For later years you must consult the USA Archery website for the latest rules on this.

Olympian Team Selection

A team of 4 individuals will be chosen from each of the four regions. (The JOAD committee will develop the final selection procedure, but it will be similar to the current process.)   Each region's team will consist of two compound and two recurve shooters.
A training camp will be held at the Olympic Training Center for these individuals. The training camp will emphasize the skills needed to be part of a team; whether shooting or traveling. The Date for the year 2002 is August 19 -25, 2002.
Each team will act as a team. They will have meals together, train together, and determine activities together. The camp will include shooting a qualification round, and an actual team round. We hope to determine some sort of prize for the winning regional teams (one compound, one recurve). The prize is yet to be determined.


FITNESS - how hard can it be to shoot a pointy stick?

Or, how much work is involved in a typical outdoor tournament?

Let's estimate the following:

8 practice ends of 6 arrows each, even at the short distance for twice at each of 4 distances. FITA of 144 arrows, 36 at each distance. Archer retires 10 meters behind shooting line after each end. Makes 2 trips to the portaloo, figure 50 meters each roundtrip to johnny. So I reckon the average archer will walk around 5300 meters (including trips to the loo). 5300 meters converts to 5687 yards, or around 3.3 miles!

Assumptions for an archer shooting 70/60/50/30 meters in tourney:
Competition consists of 12 ends of 6, 24 ends of 3. To/From Shooting Line: 36 ends + 8 warmups, total * 20 meters = 880 meters Warmups: 2 * 140 meters + 2 * 120m + 2 * 100m + 2 * 60m = 840 meters walked for warmups
Competition: 6 ends * 140m + 6 * 120m + 12 * 100m + 12 * 60m = 3480 meters total for FITA shooting

Assuming the archer lets down once per 20 arrows, and is shooting a 40 pound bow: 48 practice arrows plus 144 arrows plus 15 let downs = 8280 pounds pulled/lifted. I have no idea how much pull it takes to remove each arrow from a whitetail buttress, but I'll WAG it's at least 10 pounds, adding another 2070 pounds, so the archer is going to pull a total of around 10,000 pounds! Of course, the weenies with the cams and let-off will pull much less<G>....

So an archer actually does quite a bit of exercise in a tournament!

National Tournament - Do we have to do BOTH of them!?

Currently, there are two National Championships for archers under eighteen in the United States. Travel costs force many archers to choose between the two tournaments; having to attend both (especially when they may be on the other side of the US) may be prohibitively expensive.

For most years, the JOAD National Tournament is designated as the National Championship for the JOAD Division. PLEASE NOTE: The Youth divisions will be shot at the USA Archery(used to be NAA) Nationals.

The JOAD National tournaments are for the kids, immensely fun, provided that the parents don't do the typical parental overbearing  thing.  Regardless of how good the archer is (or bad, within reason) he or she will find plenty of potential friends to visit with in between the pesky interruptions to shoot arrows.  My advice to the parents is to follow the kid's lead and just sit back and enjoy it all.  Offer lots of positive encouragement and NEVER criticize negatively.   It is NOT your time, it is your archer's time. Honor it and him/her.

Outdoor Tourney Checklist

If you are taking one or more kids to an outdoor tournament, particularly the nationals, you want to bring along certain items.

Plan to bring or share a canopy or awning or sunshade of some kind - The kids will probably have their own shade provided by the Tourney organizers, but you need some, too.

Comfortable, portable chairs.    Sunscreen, bug repellant, ice chest, water, may be called for depending on the climate.  snacks are good.  In Texas, misters and battery-driven fans are popular. 

ARCHERS SHOOT IN THE RAIN!  Only lightning will cause a director to halt shooting, so be prepared with layers of tight-fitting clothes if rain would mean the archer would be chilled or cold.

Binoculars or a spare spotting scope is usually useful so the parents can enjoy the competition.

Spotting arrows

Especially in the beginning of tournament participation a young archer may have trouble figuring out where the arrow went.   It's important to know, in case an adjustment needs to be made.  If the archer waits for all 6 arrows to be done before s/he catches the problem a lot of points can be lost needlessly.  Most older archers will have a spotting scope on a tripod for the long distances, and a small pocket set for closer distances.  After each shot most will identify their arrow (by color of nock and/or fletches) to assure they have the right setting on their bowsight.  (That is why it's important to have a unique color, different from the other archers on the target - so take extra sets of nocks in various colors to allow your archer to switch out nocks if necessary to insure s/he can recognize his own arrows against all the other arrows in the target bail)

As an alternative to a spotting scope, It is legal for a parent to hold some kind of system, say, a small target, and to point on that target in hand as to where the archer's arrow went on the target.  This is helpful to the kids who are not used to the environment, who might have trouble seeing where their arrows went.   The parent CANNOT call out to the archer, but can silently use a graphic to indicate results.  The only problem is that the archer must then change focus from the target and shooting back to the bleachers, find the parent, figure out the graphic, and then decide what to do.   Ultimately the archer should learn to use a scope, but in the beginning this is indeed legal and acceptable.

BRING AS MANY SPARE PARTS AS YOU HAVE for your archer's bow kit.  At a minimum, you should have at least 12 arrows (in my humble opinion, since if a target with 6 arrows in it tips over and ruins all 6 - rare but it has happened), extra fletchings/spinwings, spare nocks of both the same and different colors (7 minimum of any color, in case the other archers on target have the same vanes and nock colors), another broken-in bowstring with proper nocking point/kisser button located, armguard, finger tab (again, broken in), finger-sling, mechanical release if compound shooter,chest protector. 

A bowstand is not required, but is very handy - the alternative is that the archer props the bow up with an arrow, which gets messy if the ground is soggy due to rain.

ALL ARCHERS MISS THE TARGET occasionally!   For newer archers, a metal detector is actually quite useful to find arrows that miss the buttress and burrow into the turf, often disappearing completely from sight.   Since they have metal in them, arrows can be found more easily.  Most JOAD tournaments will have a metal detector at the DOS stand - do not be afraid to ask for it and for help locating an arrow.  It is commonplace, even at adult senior events!



FINAL NOTE from the webmaster:  For anyone, archery should be fun.  This is especially important for youth archers.  Parents, encourage your archer, but don't force.  Many parents have found success by requiring the archer to commit and re-commit to the sport prior to each escalation (purchase) of equipment, and some have driven the archer from the field by overbearing and excessively competitive attitudes.

Archery is indeed a sport for life, and one they can take pride in no matter how old they are - don't drive them away from it by trying to force the sport on them.   Try to use the archer's own "Personal Best" as your gauge, rather than any tournament or other outside criteria for advancement.   Place emphasis on what matters - the happiness and growth of your child as evidenced by her interest in the sport and encourage her to take pride in her accomplishment.  Even one point added to a personal best (PB) is a reason to celebrate!  When you run into trouble where the archer isn't happy, has a problem, or isn't continuing to improve, find a certified USA Archery(used to be NAA) coach to help you get past the problem and get the archer improving and enjoying the sport again.  

What is an indoor tournament like in Texas?

Tournament day.  What happens?  Well, it's a lot like your normal shooting practice, just a lot more people and a lot more fun. 

An overview of a typical USA Archery(used to be NAA) indoor tournament in Texas

Usually you should arrive at least 30 minutes before your chosen shooting times especially if it is cold outside - you need time to acclimate, to get used to the gym, and to get your head in the right place. 

Times: For JOAD archers, the tourney director usually designates one particular time, say, Saturday at 8am, for all JOAD archers.   Many JOAD archers will also take advantage of the event to shoot with the adults in the "double FITA" event, which means that the archer shoots TWO other times.  A typical choice would be to shoot Friday at 6PM, the first half of the event in the "FITA" event, and the second half of the FITA event on Sunday.   On Saturday, shoot the JOAD event.  This means your archer would shoot at least 180 arrows over the weekend!!!  

Lines: Each shooting time is often called a "LINE", as in a line of archers.  When the tournament has a LOT of people signed up, the tournament director will make the shooting time into a "double line" or "two lines".  Since the target butt is large enough to hold FOUR targets, two archers will shoot on each target butt at a time, and when they are done the other two archers on the target get up to shoot, so there are two lines taking turns shooting before all go down to the target to score and pull. 

The line can be very tight - lots of people standing close together.  Don't worry, you will have enough room to shoot but be it is a good idea to use a deodorant IF you know what I mean!  :)

Timing:  Each line will hear one whistle, then have 10 seconds to walk to the line (red light displayed), hear two whistles and then have TWO minutes to shoot three arrows (green light displayed).  After 1 1/2 minutes ( there are 30 seconds of shooting left) an yellow light is usually displayed, so the archer knows that time is getting short.   When the 2 minutes is up, either two whistles sound (if there is another line waiting their turn to shoot) or else three whistles sound telling everyone to stop shooting, go down and score/pull.  You'll do this for 10 ends (turns), get a break, and then do it again for 10 more ends. Usually in an indoor event, the lower targets are shot first (to prevent shadows from top target arrows interfering with view of target) and then the top targets are shot. So in the parlance, the CD shooters always shoot first, then the AB shooters)

Dress: you need to comply with the USA Archery(used to be NAA) dress code if you want to shoot.  Check here for the rules

Equipment: Bring as much spare equipment as you can - it is especially good to have a backup bowstring, finger tab, arm guard, etc.  You need at least 4 arrows that are properly marked.  You will shoot 3 at a time (per end), and if one gets disabled by a lost fletch or broken nock, you'll be glad for the spare.

Remember that the shooting will go on for several hours - be prepared, food-wise.  Eat well enough before that you aren't feeling sleepy, for example, but also so that your stomach isn't argewing with your backbone about whether your throat has been cut, by the last end. 

On a related note, you will be shooting sixty arrows under most conditions, so you want to practice shooting often enough and hard enough to be able to not feel "totally whupped" by the time arrow number 60 comes around.   Work up to it gradually, though - don't expect that you can go from 20 arrows a day to 60 or even more in just a day or two, and still be able to make your best shots.

This is really fun.  You get to meet lots of other archers your own age, and everyone there is just trying to do their best.  So you plan to do your best too.  Make some new friends.  Learn a little about yourself.  HAVE FUN.  And don't put too much pressure on yourself - it's all for fun.  For more information, take a look at the pictures page, of the various indoor tournaments.

BEST:

In 2005-2006, the USA Archery(used to be NAA) brought Kisik Lee from Australia to the United States to take the newly created position of National Head Coach.   Coach Lee has been associated with elite archery performance since the early 80s, producing archers at every Olympics since then that have won a medal during the Olympics.   He formulated an approach to teaching a method that emphasizes using the assets of the human physique in what he calls the KSL (KiSik Lee) shot cycle.  He realized that the form that best creates consistency relies on the bones of the human body to take on the stress of the drawn bow.   Putting the archer's bones, from the toes up to the top of the skull, in a certain position results in the most stable configuration for archery. 

For example, if the head is not rotated towards the target - if the archer is looking at the target from the corners of the eyes instead of more like a raptor eyeing its prey, the nerurological and physiological limitations of the human body are such that the person cannot exert maximum muscle strength.  In other words, you are not as strong when you are looking at the target from the corner of your eyes.  If you, the archer, put your shoulders into an alignment with the bow arm, the bones can be brought to hold the majority of weight of the bow and the muscles then just perform a stabilization of the bones instead of resisting the draw weight of the bow.

BEST is the acronym for Biomechanically Efficient Shooting Technique.   It is not is easy as it sounds - achieving proper alignment requires careful training with the insights taught by KiSik Lee.  He has taught a number of archery coaches to the point where they understand and can in turn teach the BEST method to novice, intermediate, and advanced archers intersted in being better shooters.  A basic tenet of the BEST method is that if an archer can be taught to use the best mechanical method, then during the times of extreme stress (ie, the championships of a tournament) the archer will be better equipped to continue shooting his or her "average" best shot.   KiSik Lee's history definitely shows that he has the right idea.  Coupling his innovative methods with the attitudes of American athletes may serve to reverse a decade-long trend of decline in the international performance of US archers' scores.

The USA Archery website has a page that lists by region the certified High Performance Coaches (HPC) that are able to teach the BEST method to your archer. BEST can be taught to the most basic beginner.  It can ensure that the archer, no matter who, will be able to be the best archer he or she can. It does not guarantee an olympic medal, but it gives the archer the best chance at being, well, the best possible. 

 

Index:

3-spot Targets
Anchor Point
Archers Paradox
Arrow materials
Arrow Spine
Barebow
BEST

Bow Types
Button
Choosing a compound  bow
compound bow
cushion
Draw Weight
Dry Fire
Ends
GeeGaws
Fletching Vanes
Vanes
FITA Olympic Rounds (FOR)
Grouping
Handedness (Left or Right)
Indoor Outdoor Tournaments
JOAD Divisions
Olympian Scores
Olympic (aka recurve)
Over-bowing
Pain
Personal Best
Pins
Plunger
Recurve(aka Olympic)
Releases
Robin Hoods
Rounds Explanations
Rounds
Safety
Scoring
Spinwings compared to Feathers
Sydney Olympic Scores
Target Faces
Target Panic
Tournaments
Tournament Description
Tuning